What secrets are hiding in your patient monitor?

What secrets are hiding in your patient monitor?

This post is very exciting to me.  All of us in the field of Neonatology are used to staring at patient monitors.  With each version of whatever product we are using there seems to be a new feature that is added to soothe our appetites for more data.  The real estate on the screen is becoming more and more precious as various devices such as ventilators, NIRS and other machines become capable of displaying their information in a centralized place.  The issue though is that there is only so much space available to display all of this information but underneath the hood so to speak is so much more!

Come Along For The Ride

One of our Neonatologists Dr. Yasser Elsayed has been very aware of these features embedded in the patient monitor.  Through teaching on rounds, some of our staff have become aware of these features but delivering this content to the masses has been an issue.  That is where this post and it’s linked content come into play.  I have created a new Youtube playlist where all of this great content can be found.  Each video is very watchable with most being 5-7 minutes long with the longest being 14:16.  Each video starts with a demonstration on the patient monitor of the lesson being taught and how to access the data using the patient monitor (in this case a Phillips but I have no doubt many other monitors have the same tech – just ask your rep how to get it) followed by a brief voice-over powerpoint to deliver the essential concepts.

However you wish to digest the information is up to you but as they are short we hope that you will be able to find the content you need quickly and apply the knowledge to patient care.  How can you use the information?  The next time a patient is giving you cause to worry try looking into some of the deeper trends that the monitor is hiding from plain sight. Is there a trend towards becoming hypotensive for the patient that can be revealed in their blood pressure histogram?  Maybe the issue lies with the way the patient is being ventilated and examining trends in the pleth waveforms may reveal where the underlying problem lies.

 

The Topics (click the links to go to Youtube)

Complete List of Videos

Part 1 – Using Histograms

Part 2 – How to interpret blood pressure histograms

Part 3 – Using vital signs as trends

Part 4 – Impact of ventilation on pleth waveforms

Part 5 – How to interpret arterial pressure waveforms

Part 6 – Near Infrared Spectroscopy

Can topical breast milk cure teenage and adult acne?

Can topical breast milk cure teenage and adult acne?

A recent post on the intranasal application of breast milk Can intranasal application of breastmilk cure severe IVH? garnered a lot of attention and importantly comments.  Many of the comments were related to other uses for breast milk (almost all of which I had no idea about).  A quick search by google uncovered MANY articles from the lay press on such uses from treating ear infections to diaper dermatitis.  One such article 6 Surprising Natural Uses For Breast Milk certainly makes this liquid gold sound like just that!  This got me thinking as I read through the claims as to how much of this is backed by science and how much is based on experience of mothers who have tried using breast milk for a variety of unconventional treatments.  I was intrigued by the claim about acne as with several family members nearing that wonderful period of the teenage years I wondered might there have been a treatment right under my nose all this time?  Before going on I will tell you what this post is not.  This is not going to be about telling everyone that this is a terrible idea. What this is about is breaking down the science that is behind the articles that have surfaced on the internet about its use.  I thought it was interesting and I hope you do too!

The Year Was 2009

The story begins here (or at least this is the point that I found some evidence). A group of nanoengineering researchers published a paper entitled The antimicrobial activity of liposomal lauric acids against Propionibacterium acnes.  The authors examined the antibacterial effect of three fatty acids one of which was lauric acid (which is found in coconut oil but also in breast milk) against Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes) the bacterium responsible for acne in those teen years.  The results in terms of dose response to lauric acid was quite significant.

This is where the link in the story begins. Lauric acid kills P. Acne and it is found in high concentrations in breast milk so might topical application of breast milk treat acne?  From what I can see this concept didn’t take off right away but a few years later it would.

Next we move on to 2013

This same group published In vivo treatment of Propionibacterium acnes infection with liposomal lauric acids. in 2013.  This time around they used a mouse model and demonstrated activity against P. Acnes using a liposomal gel delivery system to get the Lauric acid onto the skin of the mouse.  Interestingly, the gel did not cause any irritation of the mouse skin but using the traditional benzoyl peroxide and salicylic acid caused severe irritation.  From this it appears that the news story broke about using breast milk to treat acne as I note several lay press news stories about the same after 2013.  Let’s be clear though about what the state of knowledge is at this point.  Lauric acid kills P. Acne without irritating skin in a mouse model.  As with many early discoveries people can get very excited and apply the same to humans after extrapolation.

What Happened Since Then?

Well, in late 2018 this study was released Design, preparation, and evaluation of liposomal gel formulations for treatment of acne: in vitro and in vivo studies. This is another animal study but this time in the rat which demonstrated application of the gel led to “∼2 fold reduction in comedones count and cytokines (TNF-α and IL-1β) on co-application with curcumin and lauric acid liposomal gel compared to placebo treated group.”  Essentially, comedones were reduced and markers of inflammation.  So not only do we see an antimicrobial effect, once the bacteria are erradicated, there is a clinical reduction in acne lesions!

Where do we go from here?

This story is still evolving.  Based on the animal research thus far here is what I believe.

1. Lauric acid a fatty acid found in breast milk can kill P. Acne.

2. Lauric acid provided in a gel form and topically applied to rodents with acne can achieve clinical benefits.

3. Whereas current standard treatments of benzoyl peroxide and salicylic acid cause inflammation of the skin with a red complexion, lauric acid does not seem to have that effect.

These are pretty incredible findings and I have no doubt, pharmaceutical companies will be bringing forth treatments with lauric acid face creams (they already exist) with a target for acne soon enough.  The question though is whether families should go the “natural route” and apply expressed breast milk to their teenagers face.  Aside from the issue of whether or not your teenager would allow that if they knew what it was the other question is what might grow on the skin where breast milk is left.  I am not aware of any further studies looking at other bacteria (since P. Acnes certainly isn’t welcome around breast milk) but that is one potential concern.

In the end though I think the research is still a little premature.  We don’t have human trials at this point although I suspect they are coming.  Can I say this is a terrible idea if you are currently using breast milk in such a fashion?  I suppose I can’t as there is some data presented above that would give some credibility to the strategy.  I am curious for those who read this post what your experience has been if you have used breast milk for acne or for other skin conditions.

Does it really work?!?

 

Do you know what’s in your tube of glucose gel?

Do you know what’s in your tube of glucose gel?

Hypoglycemia has been a frequent topic of posts over the last few years. Specifically, the use of dextrose gels to avoid admission for hypoglycemia and evidence that such a strategy in not associated with adverse outcomes in childhood. What we know is that dextrose gels work and for those centres that have embraced this strategy a reduction in IV treatment with dextrose has been noted as well.

Dextrose gels however in the trials were designed to test the hypothesis that use of 0.5 mL/kg of 40% dextrose gel would be an effective strategy for managing hypoglycemia. In the Sugar Babies trial the dextrose gel was custom made and in so doing an element of quality control was made possible.

In Canada we have had access to a couple products for use in the newborn; instaglucose and dex4. Both products are listed as being a 40% dextrose gel but since they are not made in house so to speak it leaves open the question of how consistent the product is. Researchers in British Columbia sought to examine how consistent the gels were in overall content and throughout the gel in the tube. The paper by A. Solimano et al is entitled Dextrose gels for neonatal transitional hypoglycemia: What are we giving our babies? As an aside, the lead author Alfonso was just announced as the 2019 recipient of the Canadian Pediatric Society Distinguished Neonatologist award so I couldn’t see a better time to provide some thoughts on this paper!

What did they find?

The study examined three tubes each of instaglucose and dex4. For each tube the researchers sampled dextrose gel from the top, middle and bottom and then the dextrose content per gram of gel determined as well as gel density. Glucose concentrations were analyzed high-pressure liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) and gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS) were used to determine glucose concentrations and identify other carbohydrates, respectively. In terms of consistency the gels were found to be quite variable with dextrose content that for instaglucose could be as much as 81% and 43% different for dex4. Differences also existed between the different sections of the tubes so depending on the whether it was a fresh tube you were using or not the amount of dextrose could vary.
The authors also discovered that while dex4 contained almost exclusively dextrose, instaglucose contained other carbohydrates not listed on the manufacturer’s ingredient list.

What does it all mean?

The differences are interesting for sure. If the glucose gels are not consistent though should we stop using them? I think the answer to that at least for me is no. Although the data is unpublished, our own centres experience has been that admissions for hypoglycemia have indeed fallen since the introduction of dextrose gel usage (we use instaglucose). What I can only surmise is that in some cases patients may be getting 40% but perhaps in others they are getting as little as 20% or as much as 60% (I don’t know exactly what the range would be but just using this as an example). In some cases of “gel failure” perhaps it is for some babies, receipt of low dextrose containing gel that is at fault or it may be they just have high glucose requirements that gel is not enough to overcome. Other infants who respond quickly to glucose gel may be getting a large dose of dextrose in comparison. Overall though, it still seems to be effective.
What I take from this study is certainly that there is variation in the commercially prepared product. Producing the gel in the hospital pharmacy might allow for better quality control and would seem to be something worth pursuing.

Can intranasal application of breastmilk cure severe IVH?

Can intranasal application of breastmilk cure severe IVH?

It isn’t often in Neonatology these days that something truly innovative comes along. While the study I will be discussing is certainly small I think it represents the start of something bigger that we will see evolve over the coming years.

There is no question that the benefits of mother’s own milk are extensive and include such positive outcomes as improved cognition in preterm infants and reductions in NEC. The benefits come from the immunological properties as well as the microbiome modifying nature of this source of nutrition and have been discussed many times over. Mother’s own milk contains a couple of very special things that form the basis of the reason for the study to be presented.

What are neurotrophins and stem cells?

Before discussing the study it is important to understand what these two classes of molecules and cells are capable of. Neurotrophins are molecules that have the capability of promoting growth and survival of neural cells. Included in this class are EGF, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, glial derived neurotrophic factor, nerve growth factor, insulin-like growth factor-1, and hepatic growth factor. It turns out that not only are these found in high concentrations in breast milk but that a woman who produces breast milk at early gestational ages has higher amounts of these substances in her milk. Pretty convenient that substances promoting development of the brain and survival of brain cells increase the earlier you deliver! Stem cells are pluripotent cells meaning that they can develop into pretty much any cell type that they need to in the body. This would come in handy for example if you needed some new cells in the brain after a neurological insult. These are also present in mother’s milk and in fact can represent as much as 30% of the population of cells in breast milk.

The Nasal Cavity and the Brain

Clearly, the distance from the nasal cavity to the brain is relatively short. Without going into exhaustive detail it has been demonstrated in animal models that provision of medications intranasally can reach the brain without traversing the blood stream. This affords the opportunity to provide substances to the neonate through the nasal cavity in the hopes that it will reach the brain and achieve the desired effect.  When you think about it, newborns when feeding have contact between the whole nasopharyngeal cavity and milk (as evidenced by milk occasionally dripping out of the nose when feeding) so using an NG as we do in the NICU bypasses this part of the body.  Is that a good thing?

Intranasal application of breast milk

Researchers in Germany led by Dr. Kribs published an early experience with this strategy in their article Intranasal breast milk for premature infants with severe intraventricular hemorrhage—an observation. In this paper the strategy;follows; 2 × 0.1 ml of his or her mother’s milk 3 to 8 times a day (0.6 to 1.6 ml total per day). The breast milk was freshly expressed, which means the milk was used within 2 h after expression. The daily application started within the first 5 days of life and was continued for at least 28 days to a maximum of 105 days.

The outcome of interest was whether the severe IVH would improve over time compared to a cohort of infants with severe IVH who did not receive this treatment. Importantly this was not a randomized trial and the numbers are small. A total of 31 infants were included with 16 receiving this treatment and 15 not. The two groups were compared with the results as follows.

The results don’t reach statistical significance but there is a trend at the bottom of the table above to having less progressive ventricular dilatation and surgery for the same.  Again this is a very small study so take the results with a grain of salt!

Is this practice changing?  Not yet but it does beg the question of what a properly designed RCT might look like.  The authors predict what it might look like with a sham nasal application versus fresh mother’s milk. I do wonder though if it may become a study that would be hard to recruit into as when families are approached and the potential benefit explained it may be hard to get them to say anything other than “Just give my baby the breast milk!”  Such is the challenge with RCTs so it may be that a larger retrospective study will have to do first. Regardless, be on the lookout for this research as I suspect we may see more studies such as this coming and soon!

* Featured image from the open access paper.  (There couldn’t be a better picture of this out there!)

 

Less Invasive Surfactant Administration with High Volume Surfactant

Less Invasive Surfactant Administration with High Volume Surfactant

InSurE (Intubate, Surfactant, Extubate) has been the standard approach for some time when it comes to treating RDS.  Less Invasive Surfactant Administration (LISA) or Minimally Invasive Surfactant Administration (MIST) have been growing in popularity as an alternative technique.  More than just popular, the techniques have been shown to reduce some important short term and possibly long term outcomes when used instead of the InSurE approach.  Aldana-Aquirre et al published the most recent systematic review on the topic in  Less invasive surfactant administration versus intubation for surfactant delivery in preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome: a systematic review and meta-analysis. They demonstrated that when looking at 6 RCTs with 895 infants, the overall results indicate that use of LISA instead of InSurE leads to a lower rate of death or bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) at 36 weeks (risk ratio (RR)=0.75 (95% CI 0.59 to 0.94), p=0.01) and the need for mechanical ventilation within 72 hours of birth (RR=0.71 (0.53 to 0.96), p=0.02) or anytime during the patient stay in the NICU (RR=0.66 (0.47 to 0.93), p=0.02).  This study has been out for two years this month and yet here we are at least in my centre still performing InSurE.

  Why is that?

One reason likely has something to do with the expression “you can’t teach an old dog new tricks”.  We know how to do InSurE and we are pretty good at it.  Performing the LISA technique is not just about putting a catheter in the airway and instilling surfactant.  There are several steps that need to be done in order to ensure that the surfactant goes where it is supposed to so there is training required but such training is available in videos posted on the internet or I am sure available from centres willing to share their methods.  Still it takes someone declaring we need to change before anything will happen.  The second reason for this insistence on the status quo has been the availability of only a large volume surfactant in Canada at 5 ml/kg while in European centres the volume administered was half that.  Now a low volume surfactant is available in Canada but some centres have been slow to make a switch due to comfort with the current product.  The drawback to the current product is the concern that you can’t use it for LISA techniques since the centres practicing this technique use the low volume form.

Can High Volume Be Used For Lisa?

Researchers in London, Ontario performed a retrospective cohort study of 43 infants in their institution who underwent the MIST approach for surfactant administration in their study High-volume surfactant administration using a minimally invasive technique: Experience from a Canadian Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. In 2016, London instituted a change in practice to provide MIST for infants born at ≥28 weeks and/or with a birth weight ≥ 1,000 g with respiratory distress syndrome.  Surfactant was provided over 1-3 minutes via a MAC catheter guided through the vocal cords with Magill forceps.  What I like about this study is the reproducibility of it as the authors describe very nicely how the steps were done.   What I also appreciate is the provision of sucrose and atropine prior to the procedure.  Not a rapid sequence induction but it does do something to address the risk of bradycardia and discomfort with cannulation of the trachea.  The results I think speak for themselves that this is indeed possible as 41/43 neonates underwent the procedure with successful instillation of surfactant confirmed by absence of recovered surfactant in aspirated stomach contents.

 

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All of these infants qualified for BLES based on an oxygen requirement on non-invasive support of 40% or more.  These patients are similar to our own in Winnipeg in terms of qualifying criteria for surfactant but perhaps a little higher tolerance of FiO2 before intubating.  Additional evidence that surfactant was indeed received was the reduction to room air in 85% of patients within 24 hours and also the need for a second dose of surfactant in only 10%.

Aside from oxygen desaturation in about 50% during BLES administration the adverse effects were fairly limited and similar to what one would see with InSurE.

What now?

BLES can be administed via MIST despite concerns about the higher volume of surfactant.  What many centres need to address I suspect is that while we think we are practicing InSurE, in many cases we are not.  The goal of that procedure is to provide the surfactant over a few seconds and then get the ETT out right away.  How often does that happen though in reality?  Have you ever found yourself leaving the ETT in till the baby gets to NICU and extubating there?  Seems safer right?  What if in the elevator or hallway on the way to NICU the baby deteriorates and needs intubation?  How long does the ETT stay in? Twenty minutes, 30, 45, 60 or longer?  Thinking about that in a different way, what does that translate into in terms of number of PPV breaths?  Well at a rate of 60 breaths a minute that means 1800,  2700, 3600 and more breaths before the ETT is removed.  I have often wondered if this in itself explains why InSurE seems to be repeatedly identified as being inferior to MIST.  If you intubated, gave the surfactant and pulled the ETT out right away in all cases might the two techniques actually be equivalent.

The question now really is how do we get past our tendencies and embrace a change in practice that by design will not allow us to delivery any positive pressure breaths?!